Apple yesterday introduced the A7 chip, the 64-bit chip at the heart of the new iPhone 5S that provides impressive graphics capabilities and processing power. The mobile game Infinity Blade III launched with the 5S, and during its presentation Apple used the game to show off the new iPhone's powerful graphics chops.

But the A7 isn't just for gamers. It powers a whole bunch of features that you, the ordinary user, are likely to care about. A lot.

In a nutshell, the 64-bit chip provides better speed, faster applications, more processing power, and better graphics. That means you can download videos and update your social media feeds faster. Apple's highly anticipated camera upgrade and fingerprint-based smartphone security both also require significant processing power. 

The camera application includes auto image stabilization and a feature that takes multiple photos with each button press, then discards all but the best one. An improved flash can adjust both color and intensity for different lighting situations, supposedly significantly decreasing overexposure, and a camera sensor that's 15 percent larger than its predecessor in the iPhone 5. Touch ID, Apple’s new security function that scans your fingerprint to unlock your phone and pay for purchases on iTunes, is located on the sapphire glass crystal home button.

None of those features are easy to pull off. All benefit from the extra horsepower provided by the A7.

iOS 7 has been completely reengineered for the 64-bit processor, Apple says. iPhone 5S will be backwards compatible with existing older 32-bit applications, but Apple said developers should be able to upgrade their apps to 64 bit easily.