The city of Chattanooga offers significant incentives for relocating geeks. This and more in today's Daily Wrap.

Sometimes it's difficult to catch everything that hits tech media in a day, so we wrap up some of the most talked about stories. We give you a daily recap of what you missed in the ReadWriteWeb Community, including a link to some of the most popular discussions in our offsite communities on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google+ as well.

Move to Chattanooga, Win Big Money This Summer

Considering a move to Tennessee? Check out Chattanooga, or the Gig City. This summer, the city will host a series of activities designed to encourage tech workers to make Chattanooga their new home. From mortgage discounts ($10k), incubator programs, a hatchery program and relocation stipends, anyone looking to discover some southern charm should check out the GeekMove FAQs.

More Must Read Stories:

Pinterest Will Let Web Publishers Opt Out With Code

In an interview with LLSocial.com, Pinterest CEO Ben Silbermann said users who try to pin from sites using the code will see a message telling them "This site doesn't allow pinning to Pinterest. Please contact the owner with any questions. Thanks for visiting!" Pinterest's copyright policies and user agreements have been the subject of debate, with some site publishers and industry observers arguing that Pinterest puts the legal responsibility for policing copyright violations on its more than 10 million users. (more)

Why We Speak Freely on Social Networks

We message on Facebook but in-person I'm awkward and you're shy. When our Twitter conversation went from @ messages to direct messages, you seemed more reserved and I felt more open to speak my mind. Let's follow each other on Pinterest and share the pictures that are in our mind. I just want to be in your head. I just want to feel what you're feeling. I want to be inside of you, truly. But in real life, I can barely look you in the eye. I know too much about what you know I know. (more)

Banks in Danger of Becoming the "Dumb Pipes" of the Mobile Payments Industry

The industry movement created of any disruptive technology will create winners and losers. What entities create value out of disruption in the early stages will set a base for future success. In the mobile payments sector we have talked a lot about the confluence of technology companies with payment processors and debated who will ultimately emerge as winners. One sector that is often forgotten in this discussion is the fact that banks already play a central role in the day-to-day lives of consumers. There is huge potential for the banks to profit from the mobile payments evolution and they need to move quickly before the industry passes them by. (more)

Yahoo Takes YSlow to GitHub for Community Contributions

Yahoo is getting serious about turning YSlow into a real community driven project. The company put up YSlow on YDN in 2007, but now they've gone all-in with a BSD-licensed release on GitHub.

On the off chance you're not already familiar with YSlow, it is used to analyze Web pages against a set of best practices. (more)

Punk in Africa: 3 Chords, 3 Countries, 1 Revolution... and a Facebook Page

When Keith Jones and Deon Maas first started trying to pull together the footage, sources and sound for their documentary, Punk in Africa, they found it slow going. It was only when they started leveraging a dedicated Facebook page and other social media tools did they start to make headway. And make it they did. (more)

Hurdles Remain Before College Classrooms Go Completely Digital

OnlineUniversities.com came out with an optimistic infographic last week about how college classrooms are going digital.

But as someone who makes as much as a quarter of his income from teaching college classes in any given year, and who also spends a good amount of time speaking at conferences trying to help professors incorporate technology and social media into their curriculum, the view from the trenches is very different than the iPad-in-every-backpack proponents would have you believe. (more)

Senators Want Details On Twitter's New Censorship Policy

Two U.S. Senators want Twitter to give more details on how and when it will censor content when requested to do so by foreign governments.

"We understand that Twitter has an obligation to comply with legal requests that do not violate human rights," Tom Coburn, R-Okla., and Dick Durbin, D-Ill., wrote in a letter to Twitter CEO Dick Costolo. "And we appreciate that you are taking steps to minimize the impact of censorship. However, your announcement leaves important questions unanswered." (more)

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