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Must. Blog. Something.

Must. Blog. Something.

Oh man, has it been a whole week since I lasted posted something on my weblog? I’ve actually been busy working on an upcoming special feature for Read/Write Web. Top secret. I’ll publish it early next week. So, er, that’s it for now really.

CSS Libraries – Making CSS Layouts Easier for Web Designers

CSS Libraries – Making CSS Layouts Easier for Web Designers

Interesting comment from Lucas Gonze in the comments to my post regarding Lockergnome’s CSS-to-Tables re-design. Incidentally, Lockergnome is in the process of moving back to CSS – good on ya! But here’s what Lucas said about my pro-CSS rark-up, replicated in full: Lockergnome went back not because it preferred tables but because they’re…

Update on my Weblog Goals for 2004

Update on my Weblog Goals for 2004

I’ve been relatively quiet on the blogging front lately, for two reasons. Firstly I’ve been busily reading as much of Heath Row’s SXSW transcriptions as possible (thanks Heath!) – so I’ve been in Read mode rather than Write mode. But I’ve also been taking a good look at my goals for this weblog and deciding: where to next? Mostly for my own…

CSS layouts vs Tables: What’s the Pragmatic Choice?

CSS layouts vs Tables: What’s the Pragmatic Choice?

There’s a debate going on in the Web world about Lockergnome’s backwards conversion from a modern CSS design to a 1997-era HTML tables design. The web design community is outraged by the decision, because it’s basically a slap in the face to the Web Standards movement. Photo Matt compares table-based designs to McDonald’s food and XHTML/CSS designs…

Permutation City

Permutation City

I’ve just finished reading a fantastic science-fiction book: Permutation City, by Greg Egan. It covers a lot of the themes that interest me – computer technology, virtual reality, avatars, evolution, alternate and parallel universes, philosophy, self-programming. Heck it even has an alien race (created by humans though). Now I realise these are…

There is no End User

There is no End User

That is the revelation that hit me a couple of days ago. There is no End User in Information Flow (which is a term I am using a lot these days, along with “Bottom-Up Knowledge Management”). It took a 1997 presentation to tell me this. In the article I’m currently writing for Digital Web Magazine, I mention that in the mid-90’s websites were…

Peter Jackson and the American Dream for kiwis

Peter Jackson and the American Dream for kiwis

Congratulations to Peter Jackson and his team for the 11-oscar sweep! New Zealanders (all 30 of us) are currently basking in the reflected glory of Jackson’s achievement, like an escaped otter sunning itself on the deck of a student flat. Full credit though belongs to Peter Jackson and the LOTR team. The rest of us kiwis can’t really take…

Remix Culture

Remix Culture

I might Go Quiet for a week or two following this post. I’m feeling a bit overwhelmed by blog reading and writing and maintenance. Time to set my focus back on family, work, contemplative writing (read: not seat-of-the-pants writing as blogging can get for me when Info Overload hits). Besides, I need to get stuck into my potential Digital Web…

Moving your Radio Userland comments system to PyCS

Moving your Radio Userland comments system to PyCS

I’ve now swapped my comments system from Radio Userland’s comments server to the Python Community Server, developed and hosted by Phil Pearson. The reason I did this was because I’ve experienced frequent problems with Radio Userland’s comments server, causing slow downloads of my webpages and sometimes no service. This is probably caused by the…

The Passion of the Information Flow

The Passion of the Information Flow

I’ve begun the push to introduce wiki and weblog technologies into the company I work for. As I wrote in my last post, I’m aiming to enhance Information Flow within my company. There is some initial skepticism from my colleagues about wikis and weblogs, but mainly due to unfamiliarity with these tools. For example, one concern is…

Subscriber Stats in Bloglines

Subscriber Stats in Bloglines

The RSS Aggregator Bloglines is starting to build a lot of whuffie on the Web and it’s justly deserved. I signed up to Bloglines at the beginning of August 2003 and at the time I raved about the benefits of having a browser-based RSS Aggregator – as opposed to the so-called “smart clients” (non-browser based apps) that Robert Scoble and others were…

Information Flow

Information Flow

Dina Mehta wrote today about implementing Weblog, Wiki, IM, and other collaboration technologies into an Intranet environment, to replace an “archaic” Knowledge Management system and improve inter-office communication. I’m embarking on similar activities with the company I work for, so I’m eagar to read about others experiences. In…

Real Live Book

Real Live Book

One of my goals this year is to get my writing published professionally. I called it “Paper-publishing” when I wrote down the goal at the beginning of 2004, but I include online publications in this definition as well. I’ve taken my first steps to publish a non-fiction article, by submitting a proposal to Digital Web Magazine. I received an…

To ebook or not to ebook, that is the question

To ebook or not to ebook, that is the question

Over the past week I’ve been devouring a bunch of Etech 2004 session notes, including one I read today from Cory Doctorow on the subject of e-books. Cory wrote the book Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom and released it as a free download on his website in early 2003, under a Creative Commons licence. His book won much acclaim from…

Much Ado About Comments

Much Ado About Comments

I’ve noticed that a few of my favourite webloggers are being hit by comment spam. Bill Seitz’s WikiLog has been hammered this week and Andrew Chen noticed this morning a new trick. A spammer had exactly mirrored a comment made by me a few days ago on Andrew’s weblog, using my name but replacing my URL with…

American influence on the blogosphere

American influence on the blogosphere

Today I came across a very interesting article in the New Zealand Herald newspaper entitled “US power and influence warrent careful scrutiny” by columnist Barbara Sumner Burstyn. She starts off by explaining why she writes about America so much (and gets flack from her readers because of her perceived anti-American stance): “So why do…

Short Story update

Short Story update

I’m in the process of writing a short story on the themes of Subjectivity and System in the blogosphere. I originally intended to treat it as a mini-Nanowrimo, but on reflection I’ve decided not to publish the story until it’s finished. This is not the same situation as Nanowrimo, which was all about Quantity…

Getting back on the Writing train

Getting back on the Writing train

So I’ve decided to write and serialize a short story on Read/Write Web. I’ll treat it as a mini-Nanowrimo, with me as the only participant (unless anyone else is game). I’ll aim for 10,000 words in 2 weeks, which is pretty cushy compared to when I wrote 50,000 words over 4 weeks in November 2003. The story I have in mind will be a kind of…

On Big Goals and measuring Success

On Big Goals and measuring Success

I’ve been following Erik Benson’s recent posts about his quest to find a “Big Goal” to work towards. The conversation has been very heavy, which is hardly surprising since we’re talking about The Meaning of Life here 🙂 I recommend you go over and read the discussion for yourself, but I wanted to cross-post my latest “comment…