Following an unpopular announcement, Bluesky has backtracked on its plans to open a public-facing interface.

The decision would have meant that posts on the Twitter/X alternative would have been available for the public to see, even if they didn’t have a Bluesky account. This would be a large majority of people, seeing as Bluesky is still in an invite-only beta stage at the moment.

Many users were worried about the announcement, not wanting their posts to be made public without the option to private their posts or accounts. Seemingly, Bluesky is listening to its users’ concerns – although not without a subtle warning that all data shared on the platform is inherently public.

What has Bluesky said about the public interface?

In a post on Wednesday, Bluesky confirmed that its plans to open a public web interface have been pushed back, adding that the “upcoming release will not have the public web view enabled yet, but it will have a tool to opt out of it.”

Nonetheless, the social media platform did emphasize that your posts, profile, and likes are all public data”, subtly reminding users not to expect everything on the platform to remain private – a good rule of thumb for any social media service, in truth.
Still, it’s understandable that users felt secure in an invite-only platform, particularly as Bluesky seems to be in no rush to open up to the public. The exclusive nature of the app served it well in its early days, with some people paying hundreds and even thousands of dollars for invites.
However, while the app is still holding steady with 2.3 million users and a waitlist of over 1.9 million people, other X alternatives are skyrocketing as well. For example, Meta’s offering, Threads, has just under 100 million users. The backing and trust that comes with being associated with Meta and Instagram means that many people have gravitated towards it – as well as it being far easier to make an account using your Instagram log-in, no invite required.
Featured image: Pexels

Rachael Davis

Freelance Journalist

Rachael Davies has spent six years reporting on tech and entertainment, writing for publications like the Evening Standard, Huffington Post, Dazed, and more. From niche topics like the latest gaming mods to consumer-faced guides on the latest tech, she puts her MA in Convergent Journalism to work, following avenues guided by a variety of interests. As well as writing, she also has experience in editing as the UK Editor of The Mary Sue , as well as speaking on the important of SEO in journalism at the Student Press Association National Conference. You can find her full portfolio over on Muck Rack or follow her on social media on X.