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WebOfficePalooza

WebOfficePalooza

I’ve been writing a lot recently on the topic of Web Office, over at my ZDNet blog. Some R/WW readers may be interested in checking out those posts too, so here are the recent ones:

– Morfik tests browser boundaries – builds Javascript chess app
– WebOS market review
– XIN – a Web OS that wants to be a platform
– Is Google or Microsoft best…

News Corp launches blogs

News Corp launches blogs

News Corp has quietly released its own set
of blogs, dubbed “Newsblog”. The design is rather bland and the
actual personalities of the bloggers is not revealed. It all seems a bit too
corporate for my tastes, but some of the ‘blogs’ are getting a large amount of
traffic already. For example a
post about an Australian military death…

New Influencers, Company Advisory Boards and R/WW

New Influencers, Company Advisory Boards and R/WW

James Governor of analyst firm Redmonk has posted a thoughtful piece on
how blogging is changing the analyst and PR landscapes. When he wrote this part, he may
as well have been talking about myself and Read/WriteWeb:

“Bloggers and emerging non-traditional analyst firms are increasingly influencing
technology and product strategies. In order to…

bbc.co.uk 2.0

bbc.co.uk 2.0

The BBC has always been at the vanguard of new media in the Web 2.0 era, thanks in part to their public service charter – but also they obviously have a lot of smart, innovative thinkers on board. Today they announced “bbc.co.uk 2.0”, which will be a full-on attempt to turn BBC online into a Web 2.0 poster boy. They’re even going to create a…

Microcontent Aggregators: 43Things

Microcontent Aggregators: 43Things

Recently I wrote a series
of posts about Microcontent Design,
using BBC Backstage as the main case study. As a segue
from that theme, one of the product types I’ve been looking at recently is
Microcontent Aggregators. One type of Microcontent Aggregator is a service that
aggregates microcontent about a person (usually via RSS) and displays it on…

Top Ten Reasons To Give Up Blogging

Top Ten Reasons To Give Up Blogging

So Russell Beattie has decided to call
it a day. I admit his decision surprised me, because I’ve always enjoyed
reading Russ’ well-informed commentary on the mobile Web. However it did make me
wonder – what would cause other people to give up blogging?
Here are the top ten
reasons I could think of:
10. Your Alexa ranking is so low that it
actually…

Why Google is extending RSS

Why Google is extending RSS

My ZDNet post today explores the reasons behind Google’s new syndication format, GData. Like most people, Jeff Jarvis isn’t sure what this means – and neither is Dave
Winer. I’m in the same boat, but what I do know is that Google has taken a
sudden interest in extending RSS and Atom. Check out this Google Base
documentation, for RSS 2.0
and for…

Priceheat – simple but useful price comparison app

Priceheat – simple but useful price comparison app

I love web apps that are very easy to install and use – and have an ongoing benefit. Priceheat falls into this category, because it literally took me 10 seconds to install and I can see myself using it a lot. To install all I needed to do was drag a link from their website onto my Firefox toolbar. Priceheat is described as a “a one-click Amazon…

Rich Internet Apps – An Introduction

Rich Internet Apps – An Introduction

This post was written by Ryan
Stewart, who is a R/WW guest blogger on Rich Internet Apps. Edited by Richard
MacManus.

In the coming months we will see a new wave of Rich Internet Applications that will
blend the web application and the desktop application in exciting new ways. There are
three technologies on the horizon that will change the way…

Microcontent Design, Part 3: Mightyv, a BBC TV listings app

Microcontent Design, Part 3: Mightyv, a BBC TV listings app

In Part 1 of this series
I introduced the concept of Microcontent Design, followed by a case study of BBC’s
developer network backstage.bbc.co.uk in Part 2. Now let’s
look at what’s being built by external parties, using the BBC Backstage
ecosystem. Specifically this post is an in-depth and developer-focused look into a
application called…

My thoughts on Google Calendar and Web Office

My thoughts on Google Calendar and Web Office

Tonight Google unveiled its online Calendar. As usual whenever Google releases a product these days, it prompted me to ponder the Google Office 🙂 I’m convinced it’s around the corner, so I decided to check Google’s progress on this ‘Moby Dick’ – the Great Web Office! More on my ZDNet blog, but here’s the table I came up with:

Web Office…

Email Syndication Services – Zookoda and Yutter promising

Email Syndication Services – Zookoda and Yutter promising

A couple of months ago Mike Arrington posted a plea to the
blogosphere for more email syndication services for blogs. Mike didn’t like the
overly orange branding of Feedblitz, but more to
the point he noted that blogs still need email. Now I’m about as big an RSS
advocate as you’ll find on the Web, yet even I recognize that a lot of
people don’t…

Media Futures: on rebundling and intermediaries

Media Futures: on rebundling and intermediaries

John Hagel has a
thought-provoking post about microchunking and media businesses. It follows
on from Umair
Haque’s post, in which Umair said that “unbundling” media (e.g. Disney
releasing tv shows for free online) is only half the equation. The other
half – the real value – is in “rebundling”. By which he means
individual…

Structured Blogging Website Re-designed

Structured Blogging Website Re-designed

The Structured Blogging website has
been upgraded and went live tonight. I re-designed the website and did the writing for
it, under the employ of Marc Canter’s Broadband Mechanics and with the help of
others in the Structured Blogging community such as Conor O’Neill. PubSub supplied the stylesheets and php code. Indeed
PubSub and BBM are the…

TV on the Web ramping up in 2006

TV on the Web ramping up in 2006

Some interesting posts
recently on the Internet TV trend, which is really ramping up this year. Mark Cuban, who
co-founded Broadcast.com in 1995 and sold it to Yahoo! in 1999, has a great post on his blog
outlining some of the pros and cons of rich media on the Net. He notes:

“The reality of TV viewing is that people watch the same 15 to 20…

Off-topic: I’m still in New Zealand!

Off-topic: I’m still in New Zealand!

It seems a lot of people took my April Fool’s post about me moving into the TechCrunch ranch in Silicon Valley seriously, so I’m compelled to put the record straight. I’m still living in New Zealand. 🙂 I don’t think it’s a case of foolish people, rather I think my April Fool’s post was a bit too subtle – which is kind of how my sense of humour…

Google Base begins to roll out the verticals

Google Base begins to roll out the verticals

A lot of people have been seeing new Google Base
verticals popping up – and indeed the Google Base homepage has suddenly had a number of
new categories added to it. As I noted on ZDNet, the full list is now:

Blogs

Coupons

Clinical trials

Events and activities

Housing

 

Jobs

Mobile content

News and articles

People…

The Future of Mobile Web Browsers – Device APIs

The Future of Mobile Web Browsers – Device APIs

This post was written by Ajit
Jaokar, who is a R/WW guest blogger on Mobile Web 2.0 and digital
convergence.

In my last post, I spoke
of the differences between browser applications on the web and on the mobile device. This
topic is important because the Mobile Web is all about extending the concept of web
applications to mobile devices…

Microcontent Design, Part 2: BBC Case Study

Microcontent Design, Part 2: BBC Case Study

In May 2005 the BBC launched a new developer network site initially called BBC Backstage, since re-named
backstage.bbc.co.uk. In doing so they put the call out for people to remix their content,
using their content RSS feeds and in future APIs. It marked a turning point for the BBC’s
already impressive online efforts, because with…