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Homage to Hyperlinks

Homage to Hyperlinks

I’ve just finished transferring a bunch of links from Outlook to my linkblog. They are links I’ve been hoarding over the past few months, as ideas for future weblog articles or just for inspiration. I plan to use my linkblog to store all the ideas I harvest from the Web. Beats emailing myself, plus because my linkblog is Movable Type I am able to…

Linkblog begun

Linkblog begun

I’ve been playing around with some linkblog solutions. Firstly, on Phil Pearson’s advice I tried del.icio.us. Once I negotiated my way around the minimalist design and even more minimalist documentation, I liked del.icio.us. However the problem is that it’s a 3rd party hosted service and I want to host my linkblog on my own server. So I had to…

Using the Mark All Read button

Using the Mark All Read button

I’ve just returned from 4 days holiday. I was disconnected from the Web for the entire time. This was a good thing, as I spent lots of quality time with my family. Now I’m back sitting in front of my PC at home. I’ve spent the last hour reviewing stuff in my RSS Aggregator. But with 4 days worth of updates to dig through, I’ve barely made a dent in…

The Drowned World of Data

The Drowned World of Data

Too. Much. Information. Data floods my mind and my actions become water-logged. What to do? There’s too much to do. Information washes over me, my head is submerged. Metadata fills my nostrils. I’m drowning, help! I’m being melodramatic 🙂 But actually I do feel this way sometimes. Right now I am struggling to manage my information flow. Let me…

Linkblogs

Linkblogs

I’ve been thinking about starting a linkblog, like Phil Pearson has just done. Two of my favourite daily reads are Anil Dash’s Daily Links and Erik Benson’s Morale-o-Meter. Both those guys post a daily list of external links, with a 1-2 line comment on each link, which pretty much align with my own interests. Personally I prefer it when daily links…

The will to publish

The will to publish

2003 has so far been a year of hype for weblogs and k-logs. Blogging is on the cusp of the mainstream. Or is it? A few posts recently have me wondering: why would normal people want to publish to the Web? Mark Pilgrim: “… itís possible that an unfiltered… unedited… personal publishing system… with instantaneous worldwide…

Topic of the Pops

Topic of the Pops

CSS and XHTML are still dominating my mind’s attention.xml file. As you can see in my menu, they’re numbers 1 and 2 in my Weekly Topic Top 10. btw the Topic Top 10 is going to be a weekly record (pardon the pun) of the most popular topics on my mind. I’ve actually created some XML files to store each week’s top 10, so I can track what topics are…

Tableless CSS project winds up

Tableless CSS project winds up

I’ve been totally absorbed in my CSS re-design this past week. I did some final tinkering tonight, trying to find a solution to the “bottom horizontal bar” issue (outlined in my previous post). But CSS positioning is an abstract thing to get ones head around. It’s not like good old fashioned HTML table designs, where you can set the table borders…

XHTML validation and more CSS notes

XHTML validation and more CSS notes

I’ve been fixing up some teething problems with my new CSS design and I’m quite pleased to report that my homepage is now 100% valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional! I checked this at the W3C Validator. A couple of days ago I had about 360 errors on my test page, but I whittled it down in two main ways. Firstly, I ran all my homepage posts through a nice…

CSS conversion of my Radio weblog

CSS conversion of my Radio weblog

I’ve done a re-design of my Radio weblog, using CSS. Look ma, no tables! Yes, it’s now a tableless design. I’m doing my bit for the web standards cause, although I haven’t yet achieved 100% XHTML validation. For my re-design I used a CSS Zen Garden design by Michael Landis, who kindly gave me permission to use it. I figured the best way to get…

Pirates of the Blogosphere – the curse of the protocols

Pirates of the Blogosphere – the curse of the protocols

Andrew Chen wrote a response to my previous post about Syncato. He thinks I want to create something called a “distributed conversation protocol” and then take over the world. Actually creating a protocol would be the difficult part, given what is happening with Atom 🙂 So no, I’m not advocating a new protocol. All I want is a new tool (a new…

Syncato and Microcontent Wiki

Syncato and Microcontent Wiki

Jon Udell is getting very excited about a new weblog product called Syncato, which is described here: “Syncato is a weblog system designed to extract the maximum potential from the content of your posts. All posts in Syncato are stored as XML within a native XML database and are searchable using XPath queries. This includes the ability to…

11 Weblog Pieces

11 Weblog Pieces

Forgive me, it’s the end of the day and I don’t want to write my usual lengthy blog post. So I thought I’d do the blogging equivalent of “piano pieces”, which in this case is a collection of various links and quotes that have caught my eye recently: Prelude No. 15 in D flat Op. 28 “Prior Art” (Ray Ozzie): “In 1993 or thereabouts, we saw the…

Ted Nelson’s two-way links

Ted Nelson’s two-way links

Matt Webb blogged the Hypertext03 conference and the resulting notes are a good scan. Thank goodness for people like Matt who blog conferences, because those of us who live on the other side of the world don’t get to go to these flash harry conferences *sulk*. Matt’s notes on Ted Nelson’s speech were especially interesting. Ted Nelson is a legend…

Rock n roll

Rock n roll

On a less serious note than my previous post, it also occured to me that bloggers are like rock n roll bands. The best bands explore a different theme each album, just like the best bloggers (imho) write on an ever-changing series of themes. My favourite band The Velvet Underground released 4 studio albums that were each different in style and…

Weblogs are the new Universal Art

Weblogs are the new Universal Art

Blogging is a 21st century art form and right now it is the most vibrant creative outlet in society. Ideas flow like water in the blogosphere and Weblogs.com ticks over with updated posts every few seconds. Anyone can publish a weblog and that’s partly what makes it so vibrant. But also, there is a pioneering energy about blogging – we’re not…

New School Blogroll example

New School Blogroll example

As per my previous post, I’ve updated my blogroll to include topics and conversations. I just manually updated my blogroll OPML file, but I envisage a web frontend for this in future – kinda like Phil Pearson’s web form for his Feed Combiner. A bit more about the two new sections in my blogroll. The Topics section is made up of links to K-Collector…

Extending blogrolls

Extending blogrolls

Don also mentioned auto-population of blogrolls, which is something that Phil Pearson has been experimenting with and I’ve been commenting on. My view is that the “blogroll” can be extended to incorporate not only links to weblogs (people), but links to topics and conversations (weblog comments). Later on you could add other chunks of microcontent…

Tracking conversations with Wikis

Tracking conversations with Wikis

Don Park has come up with some promising ideas on how to link weblogs with wikis. One of his ideas is for weblog comments to be cross-posted to Wiki pages, via some scripting that “can create or find” a matching Wiki page for each comment. For this to work, comments on a weblog post will need to…

May the FOAF be with you

May the FOAF be with you

I’ve been wondering whether to get myself a FOAF file. FOAF stands for “friend of a friend” and it is a method of publishing personal information about yourself in a machine-readable format. Or as the FOAF Wiki puts it: “If you’re familiar with ‘blogging and providing RSS syndication of the content of your ‘blog, then one way to view FOAF is as…