Wendi Deng, the wife of media mogul, Rupert Murdoch, is impersonated with a verified Twitter account. This and more in today's Daily Wrap.

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The Verified Twitter Account for Rupert Murdoch's Wife Was Fake [Updated]

Twitter verified the account of @Wendi_Deng but it turned out to be a fake account. While the account was only verified for a short time, the Twitter account garnered significant attention based on tweets that fake-Wendi sent to Ricky Gervais and real-Wendi's husband, Rupert Murdoch.

No word on how or why the account was verified, but since verification carries with it the guaranteed ring of authenticity, removing the potential for error is important. Some even question whether private verification can be carried out without some level of oversight.

From the comments:

Doran - "Because use of Twitter is being referenced more and more in courts. In this case, 'Wendi_Deng' may have tweeted something which might bring legal action by shareholders if they thought it really was Rupert's wife."

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