Today Storify launched its new editor interface, featuring slicker, easier-to-use tools for fast content curation.

The new foundation flip-flops the search and editor sides of the interface, and places a higher priority on each content curator writing their own text for the story. Photo searches are big and bright, and the results are displayed in a handy gallery format that mimics a slick, white cube art space. The drag-and-drop functionality makes story curation more user-friendly. Previously, Storify didn't have a logo - now it does. Storify has its own login system now, too.

Storify's previous user interface made searching for social media content feel more difficult than it should.

With the new interface, searching for content is incredibly easy. The drag-and-drop feature makes it even simpler to add social media to the curation stream.

Why Does Storify Want To Be More Blog-Like?

In July of this year, Storify "grew up", becoming blog and SEO-friendly. Our own Marshall Kirkpatrick writes: "...social media curation is becoming a first class citizen of the open Web, just like blogging."

The new Storify makes it feel like you're writing a blog post and adding social media to it, rather than dropping a ton of social media into a stream.

Installing the Storify bookmarklet into your other social media lets you Storify anything you find on the web, including stuff you find on Facebook. It's even more ubiquitous feeling than the Like button. Try installing the Storify bookmarklet, then mouse over a post on your Facebook news feed. The Storify button will come up.

This radically shifts the way stories are being found and created on the web. Facebook and Twitter users may be content creators, but their content doesn't go anywhere outside of the social network. With Storify, the ability to instantly gather Tweets and Facebook posts into one longer story make the new version of Storify even more powerful.

How Storify is Trying to Make the News More Social

Last month, The Guardian and The Washington Post went social with Facebook apps. Anything you read will be automatically sent into Facebook, with the intention of making the news you're reading more social.

In today's Storify announcement, they note that their goal is to "make Storify a great place to read the news in a social way."

Whereas Facebook is feeding news you're reading on outside sites into the network itself, Storify encourages users to grab news and manually bring it into the network. The frictionless sharing element does not exist on Storify, making users feel in control of their content - whereas Facebook elicits the opposite feeling from its users.

This new update comes on the heels of the SoundCloud integration into Storify, which gave users an easier way to drop audio into their streams.

Storify logo via jeffthechimp.