Responding to the vocal backlash against Digg v4, Matt Williams, Digg's new CEO, has issued an apology, promising to bring back some of the features that the new Digg ditched and that long-time users loved, including the "bury" button.

"We hear you loud and clear," says Williams.

What's Old (Digg) is New (Digg) Again

"In the past two weeks," writes Williams, "we've brought back the 'Upcoming' section, started restoring user profiles from the previous version of Digg, and made small but important tweaks to the site including better pagination. In the next few weeks we'll bring back the bury button, restore all user profiles (including comment and submission history), add filters and navigation for videos and images, provide a tool for users to report comment violations, and update the Top News algorithm and overall site design based upon your feedback."

Williams's post touts the site's speed and open source platform and claims that, despite the changes and the outcry, the site still had 23 million unique visitors last month. But as we recently noted, traffic is down about 26% since the launch of the new Digg.

And it remains to be seen as to whether or not the changes announced by Williams today will bring back users who have left the site. Even though Williams thanks the Digg community for its patience and its "extremely candid feedback" - and offers a survey too - it might take more than just bringing back the bury button to bury the hatchet.