Hot new RSS reader LazyFeed just announced that it intends to implement support for RSSCloud, the real-time element in RSS that WordPress turned on for millions of blogs today. Perhaps already more hip to the real time web than any other RSS aggregator on the market, LazyFeed is a very logical place to see RSSCloud in action.

LazyFeed is a service that tracks blog posts by topic and notifies users in real time when new posts of interest from across the web are available. You don't subscribe to RSS feeds in LazyFeed; users select topics manually or the service can suggest topics based on the interests you've already exhibited in your Twitter, Delicious or other social media account. Now the site will serve up posts from WordPress blogs in real time.

LazyFeed is a lot of fun to use to discover new conversations around the web about your favorite topics. Somehow, it does a good job of filtering for spam - at least for the topics I'm interested in. I've been using LazyFeed for the past three weeks in a Fluid single-app browser on my Mac. To be frank, it's been so useful in churning up news items that I've been hesitant to discuss it publicly. I know I'm not alone in my excitement about the young service, either. I haven't heard as much ongoing conversation about a new RSS reading tool since Feedly launched and stuck.

Now LazyFeed will churn those news items up all the faster, when they come from WordPress blogs. What about Blogger, Tumblr, Posterous and other blogging services? They wouldn't want to stay in the dark ages and not offer push subscription through either RSSCloud or Pubsubhubbub, would they?

RSSCloud is being led by RSS forefather Dave Winer. So far Winer's own RSS aggregator, River2, is the only live aggregator with RSSCloud implemented.

River2 was released earlier this month, ten years after Winer built his first aggregator.

The next question is whether Google Reader or the Newsgator products, FeedDemon and NetNewswire, will implement support for reading RSSCloud and Pubsubhubbub next. Rumors are already rumbling about other publishers and reader technologies implementing support for these technologies.

The real time web is valuable and simple enough that blog related technology companies would be foolish to stand by and watch Twitter and Facebook become the only place that synchronous public text conversations occur. When blogging and blog reading become all the more real-time, today will be remembered as an important day in that development.